John Davis

As the lens, shutter and film of a camera capture the light of a moment in time and translate it to a new medium, so too do the microphone, preamp, and tape machine of the recording studio capture a moment in music. Through the development of the film the image is translated to paper, and our eyes and brains are able to look at the print and transport our very selves inside that piece of paper and imagine being in that moment. Analogously the recorded sound makes it’s way to a playback medium, be it tape, vinyl LP, CD, or mp3, and out of speakers into our ears where our mind can be transported to that captured sonic moment in time.

In the same way that looking at a photograph of a sunset is nothing like seeing a real sunset, listening to a recording of a band is nothing like the experience of hearing that actual band: what is important is that we can be drawn into a recording and captivated by the intent of the music and the sonic environment in the same way that one can be transported into a photograph and imagine existing in that moment.

Making records as mere historical documents holds little interest to me. What has always drawn me to recorded music is the sound of the album itself as an aesthetic statement: creating a sonic world within which the musical intent of the artist can reach the listener both directly and personally, and the medium and the message become inseparable. The greatest recordings accomplish this, and I endeavor to do the same with every project I work on.

John Davis

As the lens, shutter and film of a camera capture the light of a moment in time and translate it to a new medium, so too do the microphone, preamp, and tape machine of the recording studio capture a moment in music. Through the development of the film the image is translated to paper, and our eyes and brains are able to look at the print and transport our very selves inside that piece of paper and imagine being in that moment. Analogously the recorded sound makes it’s way to a playback medium, be it tape, vinyl LP, CD, or mp3, and out of speakers into our ears where our mind can be transported to that captured sonic moment in time.

In the same way that looking at a photograph of a sunset is nothing like seeing a real sunset, listening to a recording of a band is nothing like the experience of hearing that actual band: what is important is that we can be drawn into a recording and captivated by the intent of the music and the sonic environment in the same way that one can be transported into a photograph and imagine existing in that moment.

Making records as mere historical documents holds little interest to me. What has always drawn me to recorded music is the sound of the album itself as an aesthetic statement: creating a sonic world within which the musical intent of the artist can reach the listener both directly and personally, and the medium and the message become inseparable. The greatest recordings accomplish this, and I endeavor to do the same with every project I work on.